A comparison of wordsworths intimations of immortality and keats ode to a nightingale

Integrated pictures and text. Self-educated; pious but a religious radical; developed his own mythology.

A comparison of wordsworths intimations of immortality and keats ode to a nightingale

Romanticism: Wordsworth, Keats, Leopardi.

Behold her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself; Stop here, or gently pass!

Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; O listen! No Nightingale did ever chaunt More welcome notes to weary bands Of travellers in some shady haunt, Among Arabian sands: Will no one tell me what she sings?

A comparison of wordsworths intimations of immortality and keats ode to a nightingale

Or is it some more humble lay, Familiar matter of to-day? Some natural sorrow, loss, or pain, That has been, and may be again? The four eight-line stanzas of this poem are written in a tight iambic tetrameter. Each follows a rhyme scheme of Stanza-I: In the first stanza the speaker comes across a beautiful girl working alone in the fields of Scotland the Highland.

She sung in Erse [the Gaelic language of Scotland]. The speaker says that the sound is more welcome than any chant of the nightingale to weary travelers in the desert, and that the cuckoo-bird in spring never sang with a voice so thrilling. In the fourth and final stanza the speaker tells the reader that even though he did not know what she was singing about, the music stayed in his heart as he continued up the hill:"Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood" (also known as "Ode", "Immortality Ode" or "Great Ode") is a poem by William Wordsworth, completed in and published in Poems, in Two Volumes ().

The ‘Immortality Ode’ starts with the poet’s experience of his childhood when he would see divine light in every object of Nature.

Both the poems bear a sense of loss. In ‘Tintern Abbey’ the poet laments for the loss of the ‘aching joys’ and ‘dizzy raptures’ of his youthful days.

A comparison of wordsworths intimations of immortality and keats ode to a nightingale

But the greatest odes of the nineteenth century are arguably Keats's: Ode on Melancholy, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode to Psyche, To Autumn, and Ode to a Nightingale. After Keats, there have been comparatively few major odes in English. Ode Intimations of Immortality by William Wordsworth In Ode: Intimations of Immortality, William Wordsworth explores the moral development of man and the irreconcilable conflicts between innocence and experience, and youthfulness and maturity that develop.

The Romantic Poet William Wordsworth wrote "Ode on Intimations of Immortality" in the midst of the Romantic Period during the early 19th century. This was a time of new scientific thought, observing nature, and social reform.

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Comparison of Nature in Ode to the West Wind and Intimations of Immortality ( words, 2 pages) In Keats "Ode to a Nightingale" and Shelleys "Ode to .

Romantics B Assignments